Tuesday, May 15, 2012

Taphophile Tragics: Lucrezia

So many graves at St. Mary's Cemetery are of Italian and Portuguese immigrants.  This one is by Our Darling, posted two weeks ago.  Little Lucrezia died shortly after her 1st birthday.  To my surprise, there is a portrait plaque on her headstone.  I've never seen one for a child this young.
One glance and you can tell she was a much loved and pampered child.  Those little pom poms on her cap are too darling for words.  Seeing her face, and knowing the love her parents must have felt for her, intensified my sense of sadness at her early death. She looks so healthy; what could happen to have death claim her so early?

For more cemetery wanderings, visit Julie's Taphophile Tragics.

19 comments:

  1. Headstone portrait is interesting.. Makes you wonder what this family's story is.

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  2. Touching and tragic indeed.

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  3. We tend to think first of disease, when Death takes a very young one. But it could also have been an unlucky accident. She is indeed a picture of health... and a cutie-pie. I wonder who brings her the flowers?

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  4. I was just going to comment on the fresh flowers then noticed the previous comment by Francisca referred to my question too! I doubt her parents would be still placing flowers there. Such a sweet sense of wonder on this little one's face!

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  5. a prayer for little Lucrezia that she died so young!!

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  6. Normal childhood illnesses claimed a lot of children's lives back then, before it became common pratice to vaccinate. Of course she could have died due to an accident. Gravestone ceramics are rare in the UK, I guess our climate isn't the best to preserve them. But there are a few, some of them of babies post mortum. I guess it was another comfort for loved ones to be able to 'see' their deceased when they visited the grave.

    Herding Cats

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  7. I hadn't noted the portrait when I saw this before. Quite striking!

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  8. What a lovely sweet girl. So sad.

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  9. The poor wee mite - and parents.

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  10. such portraits are very much discouraged in cemeteries here - to answer your query on Hyde DP I think the WW1 grave was probably the last at St George's - burials these days take place in the municipal cemetery but cremation seems to be the flavour of the day these days.

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  11. I also wonder who would put the flowers on the grave. Perhaps a very elderly sibling or niece/nephew.

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  12. Such a sweet face, Interesting headstone sculpture too.

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  13. She was a cute little girl! I didn't think they put photos on gravestones until quite recently. That must have cost a pretty penny in those days. It's a sweet gravestone. :)

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  14. too cute!

    never thought i would ever use those words to describe anything in a cemetery.

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  15. I am always attracted to the graves of little children, it's so sad to see that they died at such a young age. I have, like you, never seen a portrait of such a little child before, but I must say I like it (even though that doesn't sound like the right word to use for a gravestone, but still.....) Thanks for sharing.

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  16. beautiful.... she looked really beautiful...
    thats sad indeed!
    but with that cute picture she will still get some attention every now and then, at least...

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  17. And if she were 15 months when she died, this portrait must have been exceptionally close to that time, I should think. To my way of thinking, this makes accidental death more likely. She is indeed, an attractive child. I cannot imagine how her mother felt ...

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  18. Yes, a very poignant memorial indeed...

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  19. Poor Lucrezia looks absolutely lovely! How sad.

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